Showing posts with label This and That. Show all posts
Showing posts with label This and That. Show all posts

Monday, November 12, 2012

This, That And The Other

Monday Cartoon Day.

This and That was a daily cartoon feature from the George Matthew Adams Syndicate. Like This Funny World, Crack-Ups, Laff-A-Day and others, it featured cartoons by a list of regular contributors. On e of them was the always reliable Henry Boltinoff.




Monday, September 20, 2010

And The Other

Monday Cartoon Day.

From time to time I have been showing cartoons that were published in newspapers as part of some sort of daily cartoon series with rotating artists. It seems almost every syndicate wanting to be somebody had a service such as this. There was This Funny World, which reprinted 'the best of magazine cartoons', a feature called Laff-A-Day and several other smaller ones. King Features seems to have done them under the name "King Features Cartoons". The George Matthew Adams Service had a series of their own, which at some times was called This and That, but mostly ran without a title. They seem to have had their own roster of artists, rather than buying cartoons off the street from anyone. These cartoonists do not include the most famous ones, but there are familiar names. Gus (Gustav) Lundberg was a very middle of the road cartoonist, whose work appeared in Boy's Life magazine. George Smith was the artist of the later strip The Smith Family. I will have something more about him later on. According to Orlando Busini Sivic was a guy called Sid Gordin, who produced cartoons with his wife Vicky. Jeff Monahan was another Saturday Evening Post regular I know very little about. Henry Boltinoff is most wellknown among comic fans for his pages and pages of gag fillers for all DC titles between 1940 and 1970. Jerry Marcus was another much seen cartoonist of the fifties, who later devised the newspaper strip Trudy. Al Ross was one of four cartooning brothers, who changed his name from Roth to Ross.

This is Januari 1950:



























And that is the last week of September 1951: